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TRAINED TO WIN VS. COMPETE TO WIN

posted Jul 6, 2017, 5:25 PM by Jose Dasig   [ updated Jul 6, 2017, 5:59 PM ]
Frederick L. de Guzman 
T II, City of Balanga National High School

 

As a Physical Education teacher, where I personally see the real scheme of things in the battlefield, I am very much concerned about the mentality of other people wanting to win, be competitive and produce a sure-ball athlete who will bring pride and honor to the school and in the community. After much reflections, I ended up asking the following questions: “Whose responsibility really is it to produce such an athlete?”, “What should be considered and prioritized to send a top-caliber athletes?” and “How should we deal with those who were not fighting in the battlefield?” No matter how willing the parents, athletes and teachers are, there’s still other people who do not understand the interplay between exposing the athletes and learning lessons from competitions. It is a given fact that everybody’s decision is relevant but it doesn’t mean if one sector plays a big part means that theirs is final and irrevocable. It is even very paradoxical to send a very few athletes and assume them to win. Are we after honor or do we care honing athletes’ sports skills that in the long run, giving them enough experience, ample training and motivation might help them win medals and pride to themselves?

The following are just some of the factors I think will help elucidate the things that everybody should consider whether to train to win or compete to win:

1.       Fundamental training. One of my personal agonies is knowing how young athletes are trained. Lucky are those who were handled by a trainer who have a scientific knowledge and apply it in training athletes. But most of the time, I observed that trainers only teach because they are former athletes and the responsibility was left to them by the coach. I cannot vehemently blame them. But I to the athletes who are forced to do things beyond their capabilities and some are even verbally abused.in training athletes. But most of the time, I observed that trainers only teach because they are former athletes and the responsibility was left to them by the coach. I cannot vehemently blame them. But I to the athletes who are forced to do things beyond their capabilities and some are even verbally abused.

2.       Scientific Training. In order to gain more confidence, a trainer needs to employ an advance mode of training i.e. scientific training. It is a must that trainer be adept in what science can offer him to produce a quality athlete and not sticking what is just established.

3.       Goal setting. Looking beyond the athletes’ playing years is very important to hone their skills. There’s a very slim chance of consistently winning a medal given a short period of sporting experience over training them while competing and gaining experience. It is therefore goal setting should be given importance since this will serve as an anchor that will guide them to look beyond their training and sporting career.

4.       Learning from the experts. There is no shortcut in the ladder of success. And most of the time, it is not that easy to climb. It takes physical training, nutrition and psychological training to work together to create a superb athlete. Whether you are an athlete or a coach, you yourself must know how to be a top-caliber. Experts are both made to be trained and vice versa.

5.       Collaboration. Consulting all the concerned parties should be considered before finalizing the goal of sending athletes to different levels of competitions. Decisions should not be dominated by anyone regardless of the role they play in the process because in the end, it is the athletes who will play for them.

At the end of the day, our decisions in training or sending athletes to compete will either make or break them. It is paramount that we consider all aspects to make sure our concerted efforts will not ruin both the management and our athletes. Let us make this a win-win solution. 

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